Moody’s Investors Service Is Reviewing Brazil’s Sovereign Rating For 2018, According To Luíz Carlos Trabuco Cappi

Brazil is recovering from a recession, and the signs point to a full recovery. President Michel Temer is trying to form new bilateral trade agreements, and according to the Brazilian news media, he is making progress. China is ready to increase the amount of Brazilian products they import, and the U.K. is eager to form a new relationship once the Brexit issue is out of the way. The United States also wants to do more business with Brazil. Temer has a new pension program in the works. Moody’s Investors Service is waiting for Temer and his government to overhaul the pension system before the service gives the country a new rating. Moody’s sovereign rating is negative and businesses around the country hope that rating turns positive in 2018.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3xDktJglYEQ

But there are other issues that might make Moody’s keep the rating the same, according to one Moody’s executive. Former President Dilma Rousseff is back in the spotlight, and she is not happy with the way Temer is handling the deteriorating economic and political situation in Venezuela. According to Rousseff, Temer is following and being submissive to the United States. Brazil and the U.S. are planning military exercises in Brazil’s Amazon region. Those exercises will take place in November. The other fly in the political ointment is the return of Workers Party founder, and former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva. Lulu is popular, but there is a lot of political mud and serious charges surrounding Lulu, and they won’t go away, according to Bradesco’s CEO Luíz Carlos Trabuco Cappi. There are other issues like attracting foreign investors and expanding the country’s technological infrastructure that need attention. And other business-friendly programs that help create jobs and reduce the inflation rate are a necessity if the country wants to come out of the recession in a positive way, according to Brazil’s finance minister. But some Brazilian thinks the new government programs are not helping the economic situation. But when Brazilian bank profits come up in the conversation, it looks like the recession is over. Brazil is the largest economy in South America. And the banks are showing the world it is okay to invest in Brazil again.

Banco Bradesco is one of the top banks in Brazil in terms of assets under management. The bank has more than 5,000 local branches and thousands of service centers and ATM locations. Sixty-six-year-old banking veteran, Luíz Carlos Trabuco Cappi, is calling the shots at Bradesco, and he is not afraid to make the internal changes the bank needs to attract more investors. Bradesco director, Márcio Parizotto, believes in digital technology, and Trabuco Cappi and his team of directors are putting online programs in place that will make banking easier for the 26 million Bradesco account holders. Banking by phone is the new norm in the retail banking industry, and Bradesco has more than 60 websites that help clients do their financial business online. Bradesco’s Luíz Carlos Trabuco Cappi is not wasting any time. Trabuco Cappi is helping clients understand how banking is changing by implementing new programs that focus on individual banking needs. He is not afraid to go to local Bradesco branches and listen to the people who make Bradesco one of the top banks in the business.

Luíz Carlos Trabuco Cappi is one of those bankers that didn’t want to be a banker when he was a student at the University of Sao Paulo. He was a philosophy major, and he did post-graduate work in psychology. He does not have an accounting background that most bankers need to be successful. But Trabuco Cappi did become a banker, and he is a good one. Bradesco’s Trabuco Cappi and the executive team are a good example of what Brazil has to offer the investment world.